Sunday, February 26, 2012

Berlin philharmonic

  • NEW YORK -- When 12-year-old Simon Rattle heard Mahlers Second Symphony live for the first time, he concluded he wanted to be a conductor. Forty-five years later, the Resurrection symphony still is central to his life.
  • (Huffington Post)
  • Mr. Rattle has been the philharmonic's chief conductor since 2002, and during his tenure there have been many changes. He has revamped the repertory to make it a hotbed of contemporary-music programming.
  • (New York Times)
  • NEW YORK — When 12-year-old Simon Rattle heard Mahler's Second Symphony live for the first time, he concluded he wanted to be a conductor. Forty-five years later, the "Resurrection" symphony still is central to his life.
  • (Washington Post)
  • St. Paul, Minn. — What is life? What is death? Why are we here? When he composed his Second Symphony in the early 1890s, Gustav Mahler wrestled with the Big Questions. And appropriately enough, its a Big Piece of Music.
  • (The Berlin Philharmonic Perform Mahler's Second Symphony - Marketplace.publicradio.org)
  • Feb. 24 (Bloomberg) -- Simon Rattle has brought his Berlin Philharmonic to Carnegie Hall. Friday they perform Bruckner's great Symphony No. 9, the last piece the composer worked on before his death in 1896.
  • (Businessweek)
  • Members of the Berlin Philharmonic will perform at the opening of an exhibition at New York University showcasing portraits of Auschwitz survivor, David Friedman, New York City public radio station WNYC reported.
  • (Arutz Sheva)
  • For more than three decades, he presided over the Spoleto Festival USA's chamber music series in Charleston, S.C.
  • (Cincinnati.com)
  • His breakthrough came with London Classical Players in the Eighties.
  • (Citizen.co.za)

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